ECO EVOLUTION TODAY
3.6K views | +0 today
Follow
ECO EVOLUTION TODAY
ECO EVOLUTION TODAY - curated by Al Cannistra. A brief look into ecological and evolutionary dynamics, often the subject of opinionated debate. #SanAntonioONE    #ECOEvolutionToday   #AlCannistra
Curated by Al Cannistra
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

Greenhouse gases could fall to levels not seen since WWII

Greenhouse gases could fall to levels not seen since WWII | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
Researchers are predicting a massive drop in carbon emissions this year, levels last experienced around World War II.
Al Cannistra's insight:

a lesson to be learned - and do we listen?

.

.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

Palm Oil Was Supposed to Help Save the Planet. Instead It Unleashed a Catastrophe. - The New York Times

Palm Oil Was Supposed to Help Save the Planet. Instead It Unleashed a Catastrophe. - The New York Times | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
A decade ago, the U.S. mandated the use of vegetable oil in biofuels, leading to industrial-scale deforestation — and a huge spike in carbon emissions.
Al Cannistra's insight:

good intentions can destroy the world...

.

.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

Microsoft pledges to be ‘carbon negative’ by 2030, launches $1B Climate Innovation Fund –

Microsoft pledges to be ‘carbon negative’ by 2030, launches $1B Climate Innovation Fund – | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
REDMOND, Wash. — Microsoft says it will be carbon negative by 2030, removing more carbon from the environment than it emits each year, and will remove enough carbon by 2050 to make up for all of its emissions and electrical consumption since its founding decades ago. In addition, the company will…
Al Cannistra's insight:

good move Microsoft - perhaps more companies will follow?

.

.

No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

London's trees may store as much carbon as a rainforest

London's trees may store as much carbon as a rainforest | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
Disney and his fellow researchers hope that their study proves the value of trees in urban planning and that it will influence such efforts in the future.

The study was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council, in part through the National Center for Earth Observation (NCEO), a government organization that funds environmental science research.
Al Cannistra's insight:

perhaps time for the world's largest cities to get on board - with trees!

.

.

No comment yet.