ECO EVOLUTION TODAY
3.3K views | +2 today
Follow
ECO EVOLUTION TODAY
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

What is the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch?

What is the Great Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch? | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
A huge sea of plastic trash is swirling in the North Pacific — part of an even broader plastic plague that's growing in oceans worldwide.
Al Cannistra's insight:

sadly - it is not a good place...

.

.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

The extreme effects of plastic on the world's oceans

The extreme effects of plastic on the world's oceans | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
One of the greatest threats to the world's water is plastic.
Al Cannistra's insight:

shocking photos of a planet in trouble...

.

the question:  how to fix it?

.

.

more...
Candace Seubert's curator insight, 1 April, 15:27
I am all for ditching straws but we also have to realize that there are so many more sources of plastic that affect ocean life.  We need to continue making these kinds of steps in the future and not just come to a plateau because we stopped using plastic straws.
 
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

Britain gets serious about curbing plastic waste

Britain gets serious about curbing plastic waste | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
From Buckingham Palace to the BBC, British institutions are putting the kibosh on single-use plastic.
Al Cannistra's insight:

maybe the world should follow...

.

.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

Scientists create a new type of plastic that can be recycled forever

Scientists create a new type of plastic that can be recycled forever | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
New plastic PDK can be broken down at a molecular level and come back just as strong to be reused again and again.
Al Cannistra's insight:

we are in overtime...   survival may depend on it...

.

.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Al Cannistra
Scoop.it!

In the Deepest Ocean Trenches, Animals Eat Plastic

In the Deepest Ocean Trenches, Animals Eat Plastic | ECO EVOLUTION TODAY | Scoop.it
Alan Jamieson remembers seeing it for the first time: a small, black fiber floating in a tube of liquid. It resembled a hair, but when Jamieson examined it under a microscope, he realized that the fiber was clearly synthetic—a piece of plastic. And worryingly, his student Lauren Brooks had pulled it from the gut of a small crustacean living in one of the deepest parts of the ocean.
Al Cannistra's insight:

"The world produces an estimated 10 tons of plastic a second" - SCARY THOUGHT!

 

How long before there is no room - on the planet?
.
.

more...
No comment yet.